Paavola Wetlands Preserve

Hancock

Paavola Wetlands Preserve

Eco-Tour/Nature WalkWater FeatureWildlife HabitatNative Forests/PlantsVolunteer Site

Overview

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Home to many frogs, turtles, wild irises, cattails, and Red-winged Blackbirds. Enjoy a walk through the natural habitat surrounding this 15 acre pond. Upland species include leatherwood, birch, pine, spruce and aspen. This is a perfect outdoor classroom for ecology and nature studies.

The site was established in 1999 through the generosity of a 40 acre donation by the Copper Country Masonic Lodge No. 135 to the Keweenaw Land Trust (KLT). The KLT expanded the preserve to include a total 115 acres in 2006.

The trail system is accessible from a parking area on No. 9 Road east of US 41, just north of Quincy Hill.

906-482-0820

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Comments (1)

By Patricia Van Pelt

About twenty people, including several children, showed up at Paavola on April 24, 2010, under an almost full moon, thinly veiled with cloud from time to time. We walked briskly and silently to the other side of the pond where the beaver are using the old wall to make a large dam. We were silent but the peepers calling filled the air with an almost palpable wall of sound. Though we did not see any beaver we saw plenty of evidence, downed trees, stripped limbs, and 'white' shavings on the ground.

Our eyes adjusted to the black and white vision and our feet learned the substance of the trail, leaves, mud, rock and twigs. We heard the Chorus Frog and the wiley Snipe. We walked more slowly back to the meadow by the spooky derelict house and lay down in a circle in the grass by the woods' edge to call in the owls.Erik played the call of the Saw-Whet Owl and then the Barred Owl and finally the Great Horned Owl. On a survey trip the night before, Dave and Erik had called in this large owl and he did not disappoint. At first he echoed the call on the tape, almost conversation-like, though we had no way of knowing what they were saying to each other.

And then he flew to the top of a large conifer where we could see his outline, and his eyes, against the night sky. Then he flew right over us to another perch, his broad wings silhouetted against the sky. And he continued to converse with the recorded owl. He moved once more to another tall conifer and watched us silently leave the meadow for the trail back to our cars.

We got into our car, turned on the engine and the dashboard lights almost blinded us! Our eyes had become so accustomed to night vision that these man-made lights actually hurt our eyes.

Thanks again to Erik for making this unforgettable experience possible and to the KLT for 'saving' these natural spaces where we can learn and experience our natural world.

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By Patricia Van Pelt

About twenty people, including several children, showed up at Paavola on April 24, 2010, under an almost full moon, thinly veiled with cloud from time to time. We walked briskly and silently to the other side of the pond where the beaver are using the old wall to make a large dam. We were silent but the peepers calling filled the air with an almost palpable wall of sound. Though we did not see any beaver we saw plenty of evidence, downed trees, stripped limbs, and 'white' shavings on the ground.

Our eyes adjusted to the black and white vision and our feet learned the substance of the trail, leaves, mud, rock and twigs. We heard the Chorus Frog and the wiley Snipe. We walked more slowly back to the meadow by the spooky derelict house and lay down in a circle in the grass by the woods' edge to call in the owls.Erik played the call of the Saw-Whet Owl and then the Barred Owl and finally the Great Horned Owl. On a survey trip the night before, Dave and Erik had called in this large owl and he did not disappoint. At first he echoed the call on the tape, almost conversation-like, though we had no way of knowing what they were saying to each other.

And then he flew to the top of a large conifer where we could see his outline, and his eyes, against the night sky. Then he flew right over us to another perch, his broad wings silhouetted against the sky. And he continued to converse with the recorded owl. He moved once more to another tall conifer and watched us silently leave the meadow for the trail back to our cars.

We got into our car, turned on the engine and the dashboard lights almost blinded us! Our eyes had become so accustomed to night vision that these man-made lights actually hurt our eyes.

Thanks again to Erik for making this unforgettable experience possible and to the KLT for 'saving' these natural spaces where we can learn and experience our natural world.

-
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