Wollaston Cemetery

20 Sea Street
Quincy
MA 02169

Wollaston Cemetery

CemeteryHistorical Feature

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Consecrated in 1855, Mount Wollaston Cemetery was originally 25 acres. The first lot was sold in May, 1856. The design and layout of the cemetery was completed by Dr. William Pattee, Luther Briggs (Surveyor), and Daniel Briggs (Planner). Mr. Daniel Brims of the Forest Hills Cemetery was also instrumental in the design and layout of Mount Wollaston as a "garden cemetery."
The Design Commission also was composed of Luke Rideout, Lewis Bass, Ensign Fellows, H.N. Glover, Joseph Brackett, William Auson, W.T. Morton, and John Glover.

In Mount Wollaston Cemetery you will find the finest examples in the world of "turning" granite, a design technique invented and developed by The Lyons Granite Company of Quincy.

The cemetery is currently comprises 57 acres.

Local historian Tom Galvin regularly leads tours of the cemetery focusing on the Quincy granite industry (granite industry leaders’ graves, notable granite monuments), but also includes Quincy Mayors’ graves, Quincy civic leaders’ graves, and many other historical highlights. Check the Calendar section of Discover Quincy’s website to see if there’s a tour coming up: http://www.discoverquincy.com

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Comments (1)

To Tom Galvin My brother Dan and I took a very interesting tour of the Mt Wollaston Cemetery with you a couple of summers back and I was wondering if you be familiar with the magnificent elm tree situated on Hancock Street at Merrymount Park. The tree, while lovely to look at and providing a 125 ft canopy of shade, life giving oxygen and housing for birds as well as an asset to the neighborhood, is slated for demolition as part of the new middle school project. It seems the tree will stand in the way of the parking lot. I have been told by the mayor that the tree is in decline - although it has bloomed beautifully again this year. It looks like a bit of pruning would do it good. Because the tree is alone in its space It has been free of Dutch elm disease and has survived likely close to two hundred years only to fall to a bulldozer in the name of progress. Hugh Sidey wrote years ago in Time magazine of the tree's "cousin" transplanted to the White House grounds and which survives to this day. We should be making the effort to save the elm in its home town don't you think?

My brother, who lives near the tree site, and whose grandson will attend the future school,and I, would love to see the tree incorporated into the plans for the school. What better focal point of Merrymount memorial park than its historic tree. If you have information on this tree I would appreciate your sharing it with me so I may gather information for an argument to the tree's removal.

Thank you
Millicent Broderick
millicent0224@hotmail.com

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To Tom Galvin My brother Dan and I took a very interesting tour of the Mt Wollaston Cemetery with you a couple of summers back and I was wondering if you be familiar with the magnificent elm tree situated on Hancock Street at Merrymount Park. The tree, while lovely to look at and providing a 125 ft canopy of shade, life giving oxygen and housing for birds as well as an asset to the neighborhood, is slated for demolition as part of the new middle school project. It seems the tree will stand in the way of the parking lot. I have been told by the mayor that the tree is in decline - although it has bloomed beautifully again this year. It looks like a bit of pruning would do it good. Because the tree is alone in its space It has been free of Dutch elm disease and has survived likely close to two hundred years only to fall to a bulldozer in the name of progress. Hugh Sidey wrote years ago in Time magazine of the tree's "cousin" transplanted to the White House grounds and which survives to this day. We should be making the effort to save the elm in its home town don't you think?

My brother, who lives near the tree site, and whose grandson will attend the future school,and I, would love to see the tree incorporated into the plans for the school. What better focal point of Merrymount memorial park than its historic tree. If you have information on this tree I would appreciate your sharing it with me so I may gather information for an argument to the tree's removal.

Thank you
Millicent Broderick
millicent0224@hotmail.com

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